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Welcome to Our Farm

Permaculture Seed and Food Gardens

Organically Grown Seed and Food Gardens

Local Native and Permaculture Plants

Large range of sun and wind hardened plants grown for our Midwest region

Working with Nature in our Drylands

Welcome to our Farm.

Located in Geraldton, Western Australia we demonstrate dryland Permaculture and environmental conservation.

We operate as a not-for-profit – The Drylands Foundation.

Seeds

Non-GMO, Organic vegetable and herb heirloom seeds

Plants

Locally grown for Geraldton and our Midwest

Garden Honey

Chemical Free, Hand Harvested Honey

Learn

Permaculture: Sustainability by Design

Contribute

Participate and make a Difference to our Drylands

About Us

Located in Geraldton, in the Midwest of Western Australia we demonstrate the practical application of Permaculture and environmental conservation.

We operate as a not-for-profit environmental organisation – The Drylands Foundation.

Our enterprises that fund our work in conservation and sustainability include:

Drylands Permaculture Nursery

Local native and multi-use plants for Geraldton and the Midwest Western Australia
‘locally owned, locally grown’

Garden Honey

Harvested by hand from our Bees that forage from our Permaculture Gardens and Native Tree Crops
‘Chemical Free, Hand Harvested Honey’

Yilgarn Seeds

Non-GMO, Open pollinated vegetable and herb heirloom seeds; and endemic native seeds
‘Protecting regional biodiversity and food security’

We offer environmental education and sustainability training as Permaculture practitioners, and are hosts for ‘Willing Workers On Organic Farms’ (WWOOF) and HelpX.

Tours of our farm and volunteering opportunities are available for individuals and organisations interested in learning more about Permaculture and sustainability in drylands environments.

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The Glorious Autumn Garden - Part 3b
Some information is classical and never ages. Our video on "How to sow seeds" is one of them.
The next post will focus on tricks to direct sowing in the garden.
... See MoreSee Less

April 5th, 5:39 pm

Photos from Drylands Permaculture Nursery's post ... See MoreSee Less

April 4th, 10:03 pm

The Glorious Autumn Garden - Part 3 by RinaJoy
What I’ve realised over the last few days is that you can spend a very happy life time learning all the little habits and preferences of plants. BUT if you have just bought a fistful of veggie seed packets, this is the short list of what you need to know.
1. Storing your seeds in the fridge in a dry, sealed container, will double the length of its viability time (the beer fridge in the man-cave will do ;-)). BUT remember to let the container warm up to room temperature before opening it to prevent condensation forming and mould.
2. Different veggies grow better in different seasons. We’ve attached a ‘Planting guide for the Mid West coastal strip of Western Australia’ to show you which month to plant.
3. Some seeds can be raised as seedlings to ensure their germination and get a head start on the season. These are usually the smaller seeded veggies; with the exception of the carrot family (umbelliferae) which should be direct seeded.
Big seeded veggies like beans and pumpkins hate being transplanted as this can stunt them. These are best directly planted in the garden. See the attached guide.

Next time we’ll show you how we raise our seedlings.
... See MoreSee Less

April 4th, 10:01 pm

The Glorious Autumn Garden - Part 3 by RinaJoy What I’ve realised over the last few days is that you can spend a very happy life time learning all the little habits and preferences of plants. BUT if you have just bought a fistful of veggie seed packets, this is the short list of what you need to know. 1. Storing your seeds in the fridge in a dry, sealed container, will double the length of its viability time (the beer fridge in the man-cave will do ;-)). BUT remember to let the container warm up to room temperature before opening it to prevent condensation forming and mould. 2. Different veggies grow better in different seasons. We’ve attached a ‘Planting guide for the Mid West coastal strip of Western Australia’ to show you which month to plant. 3. Some seeds can be raised as seedlings to ensure their germination and get a head start on the season. These are usually the smaller seeded veggies; with the exception of the carrot family (umbelliferae) which should be direct seeded. Big seeded veggies like beans and pumpkins hate being transplanted as this can stunt them. These are best directly planted in the garden. See the attached guide. Next time we’ll show you how we raise our seedlings.

For those that wanted more vege soil details from the last post.. Please share.. Minimise your impact on the environment and yourself, try to grow organically. ... See MoreSee Less

April 3rd, 8:36 pm

For those that wanted more vege soil details from the last post.. Please share.. Minimise your impact on the environment and yourself, try to grow organically.

The Glorious Autumn Garden - Part 2b by RinaJoy
Following yesterday’s post, below are more details of how to create good veggie garden soil.
We recommend layering new soil ingredients on top of the existing soil (ensure no kikuyu or couch roots underneath) or use them to fill or top up raised garden beds.
Avoid mixing the ingredients into existing sandy soil because this dilutes the nutrient and water holding capacity of the loam.
If growing in pots, substitute potting mix for the loam for good drainage.

Recommended Rates
If you have purchased a product, use as instructed. For homemade materials, following are some rules of thumb…
1. Red Loam; 300 to 600 mm.
2. Worm castings or compost; add 2 to 3 handfuls per square metre as an inoculant. If you have worm tea add a few cupful’s to a watering can of RAINWATER and use to water in your plants (with the seaweed fertilizer). Chlorinated town water can kill good soil microbes.
3. The quantity of well composted animal manure used, depends on the type. eg. poultry based compost is likely to be very high in nitrogen (especially if fresh) and can easily burn your plants if over applied. Only use 1-2 handfuls per square metre. Composted horse manure contains far less nitrogen, so you could add ten times as much.
4. Seaweed fertiliser; use as per label.
5. Biochar; add 2 to 3 handfuls per square metre.
See the diagram in the attached photos for how to layer the ingredients.
Don’t worry, we haven’t forgotten about mulch… but that gets a post all of its own!
‘til next time…
... See MoreSee Less

April 3rd, 7:50 pm

The Glorious Autumn Garden - Part 2b by RinaJoy Following yesterday’s post, below are more details of how to create good veggie garden soil. We recommend layering new soil ingredients on top of the existing soil (ensure no kikuyu or couch roots underneath) or use them to fill or top up raised garden beds. Avoid mixing the ingredients into existing sandy soil because this dilutes the nutrient and water holding capacity of the loam. If growing in pots, substitute potting mix for the loam for good drainage. Recommended Rates If you have purchased a product, use as instructed. For homemade materials, following are some rules of thumb… 1. Red Loam; 300 to 600 mm. 2. Worm castings or compost; add 2 to 3 handfuls per square metre as an inoculant. If you have worm tea add a few cupful’s to a watering can of RAINWATER and use to water in your plants (with the seaweed fertilizer). Chlorinated town water can kill good soil microbes. 3. The quantity of well composted animal manure used, depends on the type. eg. poultry based compost is likely to be very high in nitrogen (especially if fresh) and can easily burn your plants if over applied. Only use 1-2 handfuls per square metre. Composted horse manure contains far less nitrogen, so you could add ten times as much. 4. Seaweed fertiliser; use as per label. 5. Biochar; add 2 to 3 handfuls per square metre. See the diagram in the attached photos for how to layer the ingredients. Don’t worry, we haven’t forgotten about mulch… but that gets a post all of its own! ‘til next time…
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Latest News from our Farm

Summer Seasonally Closed until April

Seasonally closed until April.
Permaculture Nursery – ‘locally owned, locally grown’.

Thanks Naomi

Farewell to Naomi our Nursery and Seed Garden Assistant.

New Season Bean and Pea Seeds

New season Yilgarn Seeds heirloom beans and peas. We’ve been harvesting and cleaning some of our bean and peas varieties.

Flowering Shrubs on our Farm

Flowering Hakeas, Sennas and Grevilleas Shrubs around our Permaculture Farm.

Revegetation on our Permaculture Farm

Seasonal Revegetation and its benefits at the Drylands Permaculture Farm.

Local Native Plants for Revegetation and Landscaping Projects

Seedlings and Plants for Revegetation and landscaping projects in the Midwest.

How to Choose our Plants

Needing to find plants which will suit your needs? Our display tables group our plants by form and characteristics. We also produce our own labels that provide information specifically for our climate and soils.

Windbreaks for Geraldton – Fiery Bottlebrush

Fiery Bottlebrush (Callistemon pheoniceus) – Colourful Red flowering shrub. Great screening and windbreak shrub.

Windbreaks for Geraldton – Dongara Mallee

Drop in to our nursery for tubestock of sun hardened Dongara Mallees. These are great coastal windbreak and screening mallee trees that suit alkaline soil, that also grow well further inland.

Windbreaks for Geraldton – Jam Trees

Acacia acuminata – Commonly known as Raspberry Jam Tree, an excellent small windbreak and privacy screening trees. On our farm, our Jam trees provide shade for our goose and chicken pens, and provide forage for our bees.

Contact Details

Drylands Foundation
333 David Rd (North), Waggrakine
Geraldton,Western Australia 6530

Tel. (08) 9938 1628
Mob. 0458 38 1628
Email. info@drylands.org.au

Opening Times

Seasonally Opening in April 26th
or by appointment

Drylands Foundation

Drylands Permaculture Farm
333 David Rd (North)
Waggrakine, Geraldton
Western Australia

The Drylands Permaculture Farm, is managed by the Drylands Foundation, a not-for-profit environmental organisation.

The Foundation utilises the Farm, to promote and demonstrate environmental sustainability and conservation through social enterprise.

Photo: Flamefruit Cactus © J. Firth 2006

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